Frequently asked questions

Basic information about the 10:10 project

 

This is basic FAQ. Looking for lots of detail? Try our infrequently asked questions.

 


 

The basics

What is 10:10?

10:10 is about one simple idea: we all commit to reduce our carbon emissions by 10% in a year, then work together to make it happen.

Who can take part?

Individuals and families, schools and universities, small shops and global brands, film stars and politicians … almost everyone can sign up cut their carbon emissions by 10%. Don't worry if you haven't thought about your carbon footprint much before – if you're willing to give it a try, we'd love to help you get started.

What are carbon emissions?

Carbon emissions (more accurately greenhouse gas emissions) are the main cause of currently-observed global warming. They are released when fuels are burned in vehicles, homes, power stations and factories.

For more on emissions and global warming, we recommend the Guardian's ultimate climate change FAQ.

Why 10% in a year?

Big tasks are easier if broken up into smaller, manageable pieces – and 10% this year is much more tangible and achievable than, say, 80% by 2050. Two studies conducted by the Tyndall Centre (summarised in PIRC's Climate Safety Report) suggest that 10% a year starting in 2010 (or as soon as possible) is the kind of target that will give us the best chance of avoiding the worst impacts of climate change and securing a safe future for our children and grandchildren. 10% is just the first step, of course, but it puts us on the right track.

Is it too late to sign up? What's happening now?

No. As long as you do your 10% over a one-year period, that's fine with us! In 2012, we're using everything we've learned over the last two years to get keep carbon emissions coming down. We hope you'll join us.

Who’s signed up?

Worldwide, the 10:10 project has recruited:

  • More than 75,000 people including Delia Smith, Sara Cox, Vivienne Westwood and Colin Firth

  • More than 3,000 businesses including Royal Mail, O2, Adidas and Tottenham Hotspur FC

  • More than 1,900 schools, colleges and universities including Edinburgh University, King's College London, York University and Liverpool University

  • More than 2,000 other organisations including the National Union of Students, the Womens' Institute and 155 local councils representing over 24m people

Why get people in the UK to reduce emissions when other countries are carrying on as normal? 

10:10 started in the UK, but it's quickly spreading across the world. 10:10 campaigns are already up and running in more than 40 countries including Australia, Ghana, Bangladesh, Russia and Nepal, with lots more on the horizon. The 10:10 Global campaign boasts more than 115,000 signups in 186 countries. Take a look at the 10:10 Global homepage for the latest.

 

 

 


 

Individuals & families

What does it mean to sign up?

You pledge to cut your emissions by 10% in one year. Don't worry if it sounds difficult – we'll help you every step of the way with tips, case studies and other resources.

How do I sign up?

Simply enter your details on the right-hand side of any page on the 10:10 site, including this one.

Does signing up require a major change in my lifestyle?

For most people, 10% is fairly easy. Unless you've already done a lot to reduce your emissions, things like insulating your loft, flying less and staying longer, or changing your lightbulbs should do the trick. More on how to do 10%.

Won't my efforts just be pointless drop in the ocean?

10:10 makes our individual efforts meaningful by ensuring that lots of people and organisations unite behind a single pledge. This ensures that we're not only cutting emissions directly but also showing politicians that we're ready to tackle climate change right now. You can boost your impact yet further by encouraging your friends, workplace, clubs or schools to sign up to 10:10. Our Share page has all the resources you need to get the word out. 

Is there a campaign symbol?

The 10:10 Tag is made from a recycled jumbo jet (this one, to be precise), and can be worn on the neck, wrist, lapel or leotard to symbolise your 10:10 commitment. Click here to order or find out more.

 


 

Business, schools & organisations

How do businesses and organisations do 10:10?

Businesses, schools and other organisations aim for a 10% carbon reduction in one year across four key areas of their emissions: grid electricity, on-site fossil fuels, vehicle fuels and air travel. You can choose the precise dates of your year to fit in with your carbon or accounting reporting period.

10:10 companies also work to reduce any other emissions they're responsible for, and encourage customers, staff and suppliers to sign up too.

What if we can't hit 10%?

10% in a single year may sound fairly ambitious for a business or organisation but don't be too nervous. Joining 10:10 is all about aiming high and seeing what's possible. You'll probably find that your staff or students get much more engaged once your carbon-saving actions are tied in with 10:10. And if for whatever reason you don't actually hit 10% then no one is going to hold it against you – any significant emissions saving is something to be celebrated.

 


 

About us

Who is running 1010?

10:10 is an independent organisation founded by film director Franny Armstrong, staffed by a small team based in Camden Town, London, and backed by a range of organisations including Comic Relief, the Carbon Trust and the Energy Saving Trust. See a full list of our supporters, delivery partners and major donors

Is 10:10 a charity?

The 10:10 Trust is a charity which oversees two not-for-profit companies limited by guarantee: 10:10 UK and 10:10 Global.

Where can I find your financial statement/annual report/data protection notification/privacy policy?

For links to policies, statements, filings, notifications and all things law-related, see our Legal page

 


 

Getting involved

Apart from signing up how can I help?

10:10 has big ambitions and minimal resources, so we're always glad of extra support. The main things you can do are:

Are you on Facebook/Twitter/LinkedIn etc?

We're (almost) everywhere! Follow, fan or friend us and join the conversation:


What's the best way to stay up-to-date with 10:10 news?

Check out the 10:10 blog, follow us on Twitter or become a fan of us on Facebook.

What's the best way to get in touch?

For general inquiries, email [email protected]. For everything else, check our contact page to find the right address.

How do I get a job at 10:10?

Take a look at our jobs page to find out if we're hiring.

 


 

When things go wrong

I signed up ages ago but I've never had an email. Is it something I said?

We send out emails once every couple of weeks. If you've been signed up longer than that and still haven't heard from us, check your spam folder to make sure our messages aren't ending up in there, then add [email protected] to your address book or whitelist.

If there's still no sign of them, contact [email protected] with the name and email you used to sign up and we'll look into it.

You can browse our previous mailouts (dating back to mid-November 2009) here.

How do I report a problem with the website?

Email [email protected] with the following information:

  • The address of the page you were on
  • What you were trying to do
  • What went wrong
  • The browser you were using at the time

Including these details makes it easier to track down and fix the problem.

I want to stop getting 10:10 emails. How do I unsubscribe?

Email [email protected]. To make sure we can find you in the database, remember to use the email address you signed up with, or specify it in the body of your message. Bear in mind that unsubscribing only takes you off the email list. If you want to remove your details from the database altogether, read on.

How do I cancel my signup and remove my details from the 10:10 database?

We're sorry to see you go, but if you've decided to leave 10:10 for good, email [email protected] and we'll take you off the database.  


 

Didn't find the answer? Try our infrequently asked questions.