posted by Cian O'Donovan

David
Cameron says he'll look at Lighter Later

Prime minister asks us to convince the country

David Cameron says we need to tell him just how much we want more sun in our evenings

David Cameron talks clock change. Photo from BBC News.

Lighter Later is now firmly on the radar of David Cameron. The prime minister today said it is up to us to tell him we want more sunshine in our evenings and promised he and his government "certainly will look at it".

The PM has a very simple message for us:
"It's up to those who want to make the change to make the argument to try to convince people right across the country that it's a good thing."
 
We are already well on the road to making that argument. On June 21st Lighter Later delivered almost 20,000 signatures of Lighter Later supporters to number 10 Downing Street. We're not stopping there ...  as DC said, we need to prove that people across the UK and from all walks of life want to see this change happen.
 
Here are some suggestions for what  can you do right now to help:
  1. If you have not already, sign up to the campaign right here and join our Facebook group.
  2. If you're a new recruit or have been with us since the start now is the time to tell friends, family and workmates of the benefits of changing our clocks. Send them here so they can sign up too.
  3. Write a letter to you MP asking them to support Rebecca Harris' private member's bill  supporting Lighter Later which will be debated in parliament at the end of the year. 
Mr. Cameron was speaking at a tourism industry event at London's Serpentine Gallery. It's estimated a clock change will lead to the creation of 60,000–80,000 new jobs in leisure and tourism, bringing an extra £2.5–3.5 billion into the economy each year! (view our research here) The prime minister was asked whether he was considering moving the clocks forward. Here's his answer in full:
 
"We certainly will look at it. I've followed this debate for many years in the 1990s. I think the argument will be won when people across the country feel comfortable with the change. It's always been about the problems of getting schools and children in the north of England and in Scotland. And, you know, we are a United Kingdom. I want us to have a united time zone. It's up to those who want to make the change to make the argument to try to convince people right across the country that it's a good thing. People who like taking part in sporting activity and would like longer days are already quite easy to sway. That's the key to winning this argument."