posted by Malachi Chadwick

5
tigers, 3 pythons and 1 ostrich join 10:10

Newquay Zoo last week became the first zoo to commit its entire organisation to the 10:10 campaign. From offices to ice cream stands, vehicles to vipers and personnel to penguins, animals and staff alike will be aiming to cut their carbon pollution by 10% in one year. [caption id="attachment_286" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Sean Sanguinette, Helen Cavilla and Alvin the Skunk celebrate Newquay Zoo\'s 10:10 commitment"][/caption] They were swiftly joined by Paignton Zoo, home of 2 elephants (1 African and 1 Asian), 3 cheetahs, 5 crocodiles, 2 rhinos, 1 emu and many more. So how does a zoo cut its carbon emissions? Newquay Zoo has used thermal imaging technology on its enclosures to highlight inefficient energy use, with the aim of insulating the worst offending buildings or replacing those that are beyond repair. They have also begun to generate some of their own energy through renewable technologies, like solar panels. Stewart Muir, Director at Newquay said: "The zoo’s primary commitment is the conservation of wildlife, which depends on the maintenance of pristine habitats," and part of conserving those habitats is reducing our carbon pollution. Muir added that, "While governments procrastinate over reducing carbon emissions it rests with every citizen to do as much as they can as individuals to reduce their own personal carbon footprint. Every combined small effort is capable of making a difference to our planet's future." Ruth Grant, Environmental Officer at Newquay Zoo commented that "Signing up to the 10:10 campaign was a little daunting at first, but the huge support you receive from the campaign staff is excellent. They are so helpful and friendly we can highly recommend other organisations to sign up." Eugenie Harvey, 10:10 Campaign Director, responded: "We couldn’t be more thrilled that the zoos have joined us in this national effort to cut 10%. Just when we thought we couldn’t get anyone more colourful than Boris Johnson, we’ve been joined by 49 flamingoes! We urge everyone to follow the example of Newquay’s ostrich, pull their heads out of the sand and get on with the job of tackling climate pollution."